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LITERARY STYLE INSPIRATION: THE MAGIC MOUNTAIN

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ROLLING WITH JAMES JOYCE ON AN IRISH HILL

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ODE TO THE BOOKISH GIRLS

The windy block (Part two)

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I’ve told you the story of the time I met Rhett Butler darling while roaming around the windy block but that was only half of it.

The door was left open, so I stepped in and, while removing my shawl off my gown, I walked through the hushed halls in search of Scarlett.

I felt like a child in those grand halls. When I didn’t find her in any of the rooms downstairs, I climbed the wide stairs to see if she was in her bedroom and there I found her in a gown that reminded me of the velvet one she had worn before she had married Rhett. She was angry, giving orders to her maids to pack dresses, perfumes and other garments when she saw me standing at the door.

“Oh Madeliene, why have you come? Can’t you see I’m busy?”

“I thought you could use someone to tell you how wrong you are and point out all off the mistakes you’re making.”

“I have enough of that already.”

“I don’t think one can ever have enough.”

“Well, isn’t this a lovely mood you have today — go away!”

“Soon, I was hoping one of your ladies would sew another curtain number, for me?

“My husband just stormed out of the house. Do you think I have time for you?”

Your husband is walking around the windy block darling, you don’t need to pack but you do need to go run after him.”

“Run?”

“Take off those heels, lift up your dress and go apologise once and for all. This Rhett and Ashley business has given me a headache darling and now I need new couture.”

“Well I’m sorry Madeliene, I didn’t know I was being so insensitive to your needs.”

“It’s alright, just bring me your best seamstress then leave us, your husband said he needs some peace but I’m sure he has had enough now, go and put an end to this story.”

“I have never met such an abnoxious —”

I raised an eyebrow at her and, stopping, she nodded to herself, more than to me, and made to leave.

“Thank you Madeliene. I’m off to look for my husband. Mammy can take your measurements, after she’s done, get out.”

Story Credits: Gone with the Wind (1939). 

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