Ode to the bookish girls

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bookish-girls-warby-parker-leith-clark-glassesbookish-girls-warby-parker-leith-clark-glasses

There are some girls in my village who spend their days by river banks, watching the world pass by, and one girl who hoards flowers of every kind. Then there are some girls, bookish girls, with pleats resting on their shoulders and floral patterns on their dresses, who have taken over the library, with their languid figures and their face full of pallor, their lips stained a light pink and scattered freckles on their cheeks. CONTINUE READING...

How to live a meaningful life, according to Frankl

how-to-live-a-meaningful-life-victor-frankl

I spent most of the time reading Victor Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning in my garden, as the weak winter sun warmed my bones and pink bougainvillea petals emerged slowly, rushed by no one. Despite barely mentioning the atrocities of the concentration camp, every couple of pages I would still need to look up at the clear blue sky and tell myself there was still so much goodness in this world. CONTINUE READING...

Reading Daphne Du Maurier’s ‘My Cousin Rachel’

reading daphne du maurier's 'my cousin rachel'

Dress: Suncoo Corinne Sweater Dress; Book: My Cousin Rachel by Daphne Du Maurier.

I think I know why Alfred Hitchcock chose Daphne Du Maurier’s The Birds to make into a movie. It must be something in her writing, in her ability to create a literary fog. Reading Daphne Du Maurier’s My Cousin Rachel while on holiday in Ireland has only made the whole idea of the fog feel even more true. CONTINUE READING...

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